Hayne Wins Third GP in Six Months!

Posted in Daily Deck on January 26, 2014

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Matt Sperling may have been unstoppable in the Swiss, but come the Top 8 it was Canadian folk hero Alexander Hayne who could do no wrong. Theros Standard had been evolving ever since the Pro Tour, and three decks had established themselves as the pillars of the format: Mono-Blue Devotion, Mono-Black Control, and Blue-White-based Control. They were never overwhelming; each tournament seemed to bring with it new designs and new innovations. Still, they were the Decks to Beat. That evolution seemed to reach its logical conclusion this weekend, when those three archetypes alone made up the entire Top 8.

First in was Mono-Black Control, thanks to Matt Sperling's incredible 13-0 run in the swiss. Then came three each of Blue-White and Mono-Blue. Sneaking in at 12-3 was Jon Stern, the other Mono-Black player. He and Sperling clashed in the quarters, and Stern emerged victorious, setting up an All-Canada Grudge Match against Hayne. On the other side of the bracket, Peter Sundholm was the only Mono-Blue player to escape the quarterfinals, and he repeated his victory over Blue-White in the semis. It started to look like he was destined to take home the trophy.

It was not to be. With all deliberate care, Alexander Hayne completed his sweep of the Top 8, dispatching Sundholm in straight games, and taking home his third Grand Prix title in just six months. Coming into this event Hayne was 18th in the Top 25 Player Rankings. Who knows how high he'll climb this season?

Congratulations to Alexander Hayne, Grand Prix Vancouver Champion!




Sperling, MattRuprecht, AdamSundholm, PeterHwang, EugeneHayne, AlexanderVasovski, MikeGillespie, RobertStern, JonStern, Jon, 2-0Hayne, Alexander, 2-0Gillespie, Robert, 2-0Sundholm, Peter, 2-0Hayne, Alexander, 2-0Sundholm, Peter, 2-1Hayne, Alexander, 2-0








Streaming video coverage of Grand Prix Vancouver provided by Marshall Sutcliffe, Pro Tour Hall of Famer Randy Buehler, Brian David-Marshall, Rashad Miller, and Garth Avery. For a complete playlist of all the matches, visit ggslive's YouTube page.


EVENT COVERAGEINFORMATION1.Alexander Hayne$4,000 2.Peter Sundholm$2,700 3.Robert Gillespie$1,500 4.Jon Stern$1,500 5.Matthew Sperling$1,0006.Adam Ruprecht$1,0007.Eugene Hwang$1,000 8.Mike Vasovski$1,000 PairingsResultsStandingsFinal
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  • Deck Spotlight: John Torrez's Maze's End

    by Josh Bennett

  • John Torrez's Maze's End

    Download Arena Decklist
    Sideboard (15)
    1 Bow of Nylea 1 Merciless Eviction 4 Crackling Perimeter 3 Gainsay 3 Wear amp; Tear 3 Turn amp; Burn





  • Deck Spotlight: Paul Dunn's Agent of Fates Aggro

    by Josh Bennett

  • Paul Dunn's Agent of Fates Aggro

    Download Arena Decklist





  • Top 8 Decklists

    by Marc Calderaro

  • Matt Sperling – Mono-Black Devotion

    Download Arena Decklist

    Adam Ruprecht – Mono-Blue Devotion

    Download Arena Decklist

    Eugene Hwang – Mono-Blue Devotion

    Download Arena Decklist

    (18) Alexander Hayne – Azorius Control

    Download Arena Decklist

    Mike Vasovski – Azorius Control

    Download Arena Decklist

    Robert Gillespie – Azorius Control

    Download Arena Decklist

    Peter Sundholm – Mono-Blue Devotion

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    (25) John Stern – Mono-Black Devotion

    Download Arena Decklist
    Sorcery (4)
    4 Thoughtseize
    Artifact (1)
    1 Whip of Erebos
    Enchantment (4)
    4 Underworld Connections
    Land (26)
    4 Mutavault 4 Temple of Silence 18 Swamp
    60 Cards





  • Top 8 Profiles

    by Marc Calderaro


    • Matt Sperling
    Age: 30
    Hometown: San Francisco, CA
    Occupation: Lawyer

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    GP San Jose ChampionGP Minneapolis FinalistPT Top 16 amp; 32s

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    Mono-Black. Paul Rietzl told me to. (0 matches tested by me, several dozen by him.

    Day 1 Record:
    9-0

    Day 2 Record:
    4-1-1

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Dark Betrayal, got sick of losing to Specters it.

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    Maybe get an Erebos main.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    Tribute cards in Limited. The new card frame (jk).




      Jon Stern
    Age: 35
    Hometown: Montreal
    Occupation: Gamer

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    Win GP Atlantic City2nd GP LouisvilleTop 8 GP TorontoTop 16 PT Gatecrash

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    Mono black. One of the best decks and I worked on it a fair bit.

    Day 1 Record:
    8-1

    Day 2 Record:
    4-2

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Erebos, God of the Dead

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    Not really.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    Infest amp; Scry 1




      Eugene Hwang
    Age: 28
    Hometown: Los Angeles, CA
    Occupation: Business Analyst

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    13th at GP Providence

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    Mono Blue Devotion, because my teammate Andrew Brown told me to and I didn't have time to figure out for myself.

    Day 1 Record:
    8-1

    Day 2 Record:
    4-1-1

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Domestication

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    No.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    Brimaz, King of Oreskos




      Adam Ruprecht
    Age: 33
    Hometown: Seattle, WA
    Occupation: Programmer

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    Top 16 GP VancouverFinals SCG Open Portland

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    Mono blue. Don't like the mono black matchup UW but love islands.

    Day 1 Record:
    8-1

    Day 2 Record:
    5-0-1

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Bident of Thassa

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    No.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    UW Temple




      Mike Vasovski
    Age: 30
    Hometown: Windsor, Ontario
    Occupation: Pharmacist

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    2nd place 2007 Canadian NationalsMultiple GP Top 64s

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    UW Control

    Day 1 Record:
    7-2

    Day 2 Record:
    5-0-1

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Archangel of Thune

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    Try to find room for a 3rd Archangel.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    UW Scry land.




      Robert Gillespie
    Age: 24
    Hometown: Ottawa
    Occupation: Software Developer

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    FNM, Pre-release, Release Events 1st place.

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    UW Control

    Day 1 Record:
    7-2-0

    Day 2 Record:
    5-0-1

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Jace, Memory Adept

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    Archangel of Thune in the sideboard x3

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    UW Scry land




      Peter Sundholm
    Age: 43
    Hometown: Lacey, WA
    Occupation: Programmer for the State of Washington

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    Arena Test League Winner in '94

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    Mono Blue Devotion, because Thassa and Master rule!!

    Day 1 Record:
    7-2

    Day 2 Record:
    6-0

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Domestications #3 and #4

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    I would LOVE to find a spot for Curse of the Swine in the sideboard.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    The Dimir God.




      Alexander Hayne
    Age: 25
    Hometown: Montreal, Canada
    Occupation: MTG Pro

    Previous Magic Accomplishments:
    PT Avacyn Restored ChampionRookie of the Year 2011-12GP Calgary ChampionGP Kyoto Champion2nd GP Montreal, 3rd GP Strasbourg

    What deck did you play this weekend and why?
    Saito UW Control. I owned most of the cards.

    Day 1 Record:
    8-1

    Day 2 Record:
    4-1-1

    What was the most important sideboard card this weekend?
    Archangel of Thune. It makes the mono-U matchup much better.

    Would you change anything in the main deck or sideboard if you could?
    I would add a land.

    What Born of the Gods card are you most excited about?
    Brimaz, the Legendary Cat.






  • Quarterfinals: Matt Sperling (Mono-Black Devotion) vs. (25) Jon Stern (Mono-Black Devotion)

    by Marc Calderaro

  • Despite being the only two Mono-Black Devotion decks in the Top 8, No. 25 Jon Stern and Matt Sperling they managed to pair against each other in the Quarterfinals—ensuring that only one would advance to the Semifinals.

    It was an old-school battle of America vs. Canada (I'm talking 1812 Old School). American Sperling had been running incredibly hot all weekend and didn't look to stop. However, don't sell Canadian Stern short, who squeaked into the Top 8 on breakers. This man knows what he's doing.

    This Mono-Black Devotion mirror match would be all about card advantage, and sometimes, rat advantage.

      Game One

    Matt Sperling opened with a Thoughtseize (after a mulligan) and saw Gray Merchant of Asphodel, Underworld Connections, Desecration Demon, Mutavault, and Thoughtseize. He took the Underworld Connections to minimize the cards Jon Stern would see. Stern Thoughtseize'd back and took a Hero's Downfall; and Sperling really didn't have much else. The mulligan had hit him hard.

    Underworld Connections turn three from Sperling could hopefully gain back the cards lost to the mulligan, but it would also have to combat Stern's turn–two Pack Rat. It was the third turn and Sperling was already on the back foot.


    Matt Sperling

    A few turns later, the American landed a Desecration Demon that was more than large enough to deal with the amount of Pack Rats so far (although there was a total of four, counting two Mutavault, which is getting a bit scary), and Sperling had the card-advantage engine online. If he could get some stellar pulls, he could maybe win this one.

    Jon Stern was on the Rat plan. He made his third proper vermin before untapping for his turn, and when Sperling began using cards like Hero's Downfall on the tokens, Stern would just discard something from his hand to replace them. You see, that way he wouldn't have to move tokens around so much. Instead of picking up the token and putting it in the graveyard, he just made a new one. Well done, Stern. I approve.

    Sperling's Desecration Demon was lonely. Every turn he was relegated to defense duty, and at any given time he could fail at that duty for the low cost of a creature sacrifice. The life totals were 11-18 in Stern's favor, and though Sperling final got his own Pack Rat, he was behind in the rat race. And the 6/6 demon couldn't single-handedly turn the tides.

    Stern's huge attack came in with five 5/5 Pack Rats. This was not including the three Mutavaults and the mana to activate them. Sperling had five potential blockers after activating his Mutavault and discarding a Nightveil Specter to make another rat, but his own rats would not survive against Stern's superior rat numbers.

    Ultimately, Sperling used the Mutavault, one token, and a Desecration Demon to block and cast a Hero's Downfall on one of the unblocked rats. Stern activated another rat, took away all of Sperling's blockers and sunk the American to 2. Sperling took himself to one to find an answer with an Underworld Connections, but was unable to. Really, he needed a card that would replace his mediocre draw with a good one.

      Jon Stern 1 – 0 Matt Sperling


      Game Two

    Sperling had to mulligan again in the second game, and Stern quickly fired off a Duress, netting an Underworld Connections for his troubles. Next turn a Thoughtseize took Sperling's only non-land card, Dark Betrayal. And again, the American was left with no gas in his hand at all.

    Stern followed his hand-based assault with a Nightveil Specter. Sperling drew a Pack Rat off the top, so he could at least participate in the damage game, while simultaneously turning on all the lands in his hand.


    John Stern

    But the card advantage from Nightveil Specter was undeniable. Two Devour Flesh sat removed under the specter after the first two attacks, while Stern used a Dark Betrayal from his hand to take out the Pack Rat before it started making trouble. Sperling was back to square one.

    Here was the irony: Sperling had been attacking for four damage per turn thanks to the Mutavaults this whole time so he was well ahead on the life-total front. After the Specter fell to a removal spell, all those virtual cards for Stern were gone. So even though Sperling's card quality and amount were minimal, the score was 18-5 when Sperling resolved a Gray Merchant of Asphodel. It was much closer than the previous game.

    Though Stern had a Desecration Demon and four cards in his hand, all but one were land. He had six damage planning to smash at him on the next turn, what was the best line for him to survive?

    Well, drawing a Pack Rat off an Underworld Connections seemed a good enough start. Though Sperling drew his own the next turn, the American's hand was empty, while the Canadian had a seemingly endless supply of land to munch on. With all the blockers he could want, and wit ha new Gray Merchant of Asphodel to basically swap the life totals, Stern was able to draw the Gray Merchant right on time and sweep the rug out from under Sperling's potential comeback. Having about infinite black mana symbols on the board negated all the work those Mutavaults and done, and Stern took the game.

      Jon Stern 2 – 0 Matt Sperling

    Jon Stern advances to the semi-finals!






  • Quarterfinals Round-Up

    by Josh Bennet

  • By a strange twist of fate, three of the four quarterfinal matches are the same matchup: Blue-White Control against Mono-Blue Devotion. Here's a brief rundown of how they went.

      Alexander Hayne vs. Eugene Hwang

    Eugene Hwang

    In the first game, Hwang had Hayne under early pressure, but Hayne managed to keep up with a string of answers. He resolved a small Sphinx's Revelation, but was still down to 7 life facing Thassa and Mutavaults. The Revelation was a good one. Detention Sphere stopped Thassa, and Jace, Architect of Thought took the sting out of the Mutavaults. Next up was Elspeth, Sun's Champion to provide a string of blockers and take over combat. Hwang's last gasp came a turn or two later with an overloaded Cyclonic Rift, but Hayne was ready with Dissolve. His soldier tokens marched to victory.

      Hayne 1 - Hwang 0

    Alexander Hayne

    Hwang resolved a turn-three Nightveil Specter on the play and Hayne didn't have an immediate answer on two lands and a guildgate. The Specter stole a Dissolve from Hayne's deck, but that was no good against Supreme Verdict. Hwang tried to build up a base of devotion in play but each time Hayne would be ready with another Supreme Verdict. Hwang kept the pressure up, but soon Elspeth was hitting the field and Hwang couldn't get past her.

      Alexander Hayne defeats Eugene Hwang 2-0


      Robert Gillespie vs. Adam Ruprecht

    Robert Gillespie

    Ruprecht's draw in game one was long on land and short on threats. He could only stare forlornly at his two Bidents of Thassa, one in hand, one in play, and a big stack of island. Gillespie meanwhile was resolving a big Sphinx's Revelation and then Elspeth, Sun's Champion.

      Gillespie 1 - Ruprecht 0

    Adam Ruprecht

    In the second game, Judge's Familiar got thassa on board past Essence Scatter, but Ruprecht just couldn't keep any creatures on the board to go with her. Frostburn Weird fell to Last Breath. Syncopate stopped Bident of Thassa. Not even an anemic Master of Waves for two was allowed to stay in play. And then the dynamic duo showed up: Jace, Architect of Thought and Elspeth, Sun's Champion. Ruprect played it out to the bitter end, and then congratulated Gillespie on advancing to the semifinals.

      Robert Gillespie defeats Adam Ruprecht 2-0


      Peter Sundholm vs. Mike Vasovski

    Mike Vasovski

    Vasovski's Blue-White was a little slow, so as it matched answers to Sundholm's threats, he was also taking a lot of damage. He finally managed to Detention Sphere away Thassa and then Supreme Verdict a turn later. However, he was very low on life, and Sundholm had Mutavaults, stealing the game before a big Sphinx's Revelation could turn the tide.

      Sundholm 1 - Vasovski 0

    Sundholm mulliganed to six and started slowly with just a third-turn Thassa and then a Frostburn Weird without a fourth land. Vasovski went for Jace, Architect of Thought and plussed it, but Sundholm had Tidebinder Mage in hand. Thassa and the Weird attacked, and with a pump Jace was in the graveyard.


    Peter Sundholm

    Vasovski played a second Jace and this one served up cards, but crucially, no Supreme Verdict. Sundholm's team dispatched the second Jace and dealt damage to Vasovski. Again no Wrath for Vasovski, but Archangel of Thune. Sundholm swung all out. The Archangel stepped in front of the Weird, and Sundholm fully pumped it to trade. Thassa was turned off, for the time being. A turn later Sundholm dropped Frostburn Weird and hit with Thassa, then lost a counter war over Azorius Charm. Unfortunately for Vasovski, he had no way to stop her hitting play again, and though Elspeth, Sun's Champion could provide board control, Thassa would let Mutavaults slip through for lethal. He soon conceded.

      Peter Sundholm 2-0 over Mike Vasovski





  • Semifinals: Peter Sundholm vs. Robert Gillespie

    by Josh Bennett

    • The Preamble

    The Quarterfinals featured the same matchup three times: Blue-White Control versus Mono-Blue Devotion. Peter Sundholm was the only Mono-Blue player to escape. Now he has to repeat his performance against Robert Gillespie.

      The Match

    Sundholm got on the board quickly with Cloudfin Raptor and Frostburn Weird. He tried a third-turn Nightveil Specter but was stopped by Essence Scatter. Gillespie played his third land tapped and passed it back. Sundholm played a Mutavault and was happy to simply attack for five rather than play into a possible Supreme Verdict.

    Gillespie played another tapped land and removed the Weird with Detention Sphere. Sundholm had a replacement, evolving his Raptor. He hit for four. Gillespie was already down to just eight. He untapped, played a fifth land, but wasn't finding what he needed. Last Breath took care of the Weird. Sundholm hit for another four and added Tidebinder Mage. Gillespie managed to stave off a lethal attack one turn with Sphinx's Revelation, but still couldn't find anything to help his situation. He soon succumbed.

      Sundholm 1 - Gillespie 0

    Peter Sundholm

    After sideboarding, Gillespie almost packed away his Soldier tokens along with his sideboard before catching himself. "Those might be relevant," he said with a smile. Sundholm laughed. "I hope not!"

    Gillespie had to take a moment to consider his opening seven. He kept, and they were off. Sundholm led with Judge's Familiar and Frostburn Weird, but lost both to Last Breaths. Unfortunately for Gillespie, he was stuck on just two land.

    "I'm good. Well... I'm not good, but I'm done."

    He had to watch as Sundholm resolved Thassa, God of the Sea. His draw step was another spell. Sundholm cast Cloudfin Raptor, then Nightveil Specter. Gillespie stopped it with Gainsay. Still his deck spurned him. Sundholm added Judge's Familiar to his squad and Negated Gillespie's attempt to Last Breath the Raptor.

    Finally, a third land for Gillespie, and a Temple of Triumph to boot. He checked his top card, and let it stay. Despite having Thassa in play, Sundholm's draw hadn't developed. He could only hit for two and pass with two cards in his hand. Gillespie took two damage to cast Supreme Verdict and get rid of Sundholm's clock. Sundholm scryed, then passed a blank turn on four land.

    Now Sundholm's wealth of spells was coming into play. He fought off Jace, Memory Adept with Dissolve, then resolved a Sphinx's Revelation for two. He forced Jace, Architect of Thought past Sundholm's Gainsay with one of his own. Jace started to serve up cards, including Detention Sphere for Thassa. Elspeth soon followed, and the result was never in doubt.

      Sundholm 1 - Gillespie 1

    Robert Gillespie

    Sundholm's Judge's Familiar was a turn late, but it still got to protect Nightveil Specter from Syncopate for one. Gillespie untapped and played Last Breath, wiping it off the table. Sundholm dropped Mutavault and a Bident of Thassa. Gillespie was ready with Detention Sphere for the latter. He played an Elixir of Immortality and passed.

    Sundholm was out of threats, so he animated his Mutavault and attacked. He played out Ratchet Bomb and passed. Gillespie was content to play the waiting game. He took another hit from the Mutavault and stopped Tidebinder Mage with Gainsay. However, he was stuck on five lands, and Sundholm now had two Mutavaults coming his way. Soon he was down to nine and then cracking his Elixir to go back up to fourteen. But still nothing to stop the Mutavault assault.

    Sundholm's Ratchet Bomb had hit three counters by this point, and he used it to free his Bident from the Detention Sphere. Gillespie had Disperse to rescue it for a second use, but it still meant that Sundholm would draw two cards off his Mutavault attack. Gillespie's attempt at a Sphinx's Revelation for two was stopped by Sundholm's Gainsay, and the Mutavaults charged in.

    Gillespie replayed the Sphere, exiling the Bident and passed with three open, but was unable to stop Thassa, God of the Sea. He fell to six, then untapped and played a Sphinx's Revelation for three. Looking at his new cards he let out a heavy sigh. "Awesome." Sundholm hit for another four and dropped him to five, then added Tidebinder Mage. Gillespie could do nothing but play Elspeth, Sun's Champion and make soldiers, crossing his fingers.

    "You're tapped out?"

    "I am."

    "You're at five life?"

    "Yep."

    Sundholm tapped two for Frostburn Weird, animating Thassa. She became unblockable and swung in. Gillespie extended the hand.

      Peter Sundholm defeats Robert Gillespie 2-1


      The Postgame

    It was a tough way to go out, but Gillespie was gracious in defeat. After the initial disappointment wore off, he was all smiles. "My goal this weekend was to Day 2. Top 4 is a big step up."

    Meanwhile Sundholm was being congratulated by his friends and trying to wrap his head around what was to come, the biggest match of his Magic career.






  • Semifinals: (18) Alexander Hayne (Azorius Control) vs. (25) Jon Stern (Mono-Black Devotion)

    by Marc Calderaro

  • As No. 18 Alexander Hayne walked into the feature match area, No. 25 Jon Stern held his hand up for the high five and yelled "Free flight to Atlanta!" Hayne smiled wide and slapped his friend's hand. These two friends, both representing Face to Face Games here.

    Both these players currently have the leaf of Canada up on the world Magic leaderboard, and are likely going to further inch up after these great performances. Though only one of them can make it to the final, both of them seemed fine if it were the other. They just wanted to play some good games.

      Game One

    Though Jon Stern's turn-two Pack Rat hit a Syncopate from Alex Hayne, Stern was able to land a third-turn Underworld Connections. This was a huge win for the Mono-Black Devotion deck. The deck had to go card-for-card with the Azorius Control deck, which was a hard thing to do when the other deck plays four copies of Sphinx's Revelation and you do not.

    Potential fist-pump number two came when a Thoughtseize bagged an Elspeth, Sun's Champion. Though Hayne was eventually able to use Detention Sphere to take out two concurrent Underworld Connections, it was not before Stern was out-drawing Hayne at least 2-to-1. This was an abysmal game-one match-up for Stern, but he was holding his own.


    Alexander Hayne and Jon Stern

    Stern's damage engine was a Whip of Erebos and two Mutavault. This made things difficult for Hayne, and also explained how the totals could be 10-20 in Stern's favor, even though he was constantly damaging himself to draw cards and the like.

    Hayne was down to one card—the mulligan had hurt him greatly. On the turn he needed to, he resolved his first Sphinx's Revelation to make the totals 10-24 and drew five fresh new cards. But the Mutavaults were relentless, and Hayne didn't seem to have a way to stop them. Pretty soon it was 6-27, then 2-29.

    But then the

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