Ask Wizards: 04/10/2012

Posted in Feature on April 10, 2012

By Wizards of the Coast

Ask Wizards is a weekly feature that allows you to ask us questions! If you'd like to submit your question please email it to AskWizards@wizards.com. We aren't able to answer every question we receive, but if your question is good, it might show up in the coming weeks! Additionally, you can ask questions via twitter using the #askwizards hashtag. We'll monitor that hashtag and pull the best questions to be answered!

To clear up some confusion and make sure players understand the two new mechanics in Avacyn Restored, here are the relevant sections from the as-yet-unreleased FAQ for the set.

702.91. Miracle

702.91a Miracle is a static ability linked to a triggered ability (see rule 603.10). "Miracle [cost]" means "You may reveal this card from your hand as you draw it if it's the first card you've drawn this turn. When you reveal this card this way, you may cast it by paying [cost] rather than its mana cost."

702.91b If a player chooses to reveal a card using its miracle ability, he or she plays with that card revealed until that card leaves his or her hand, that ability resolves, or that ability otherwise leaves the stack.

* You still draw the card, whether you use the miracle ability or not. Any ability that triggers whenever you draw a card, for example, will trigger. If you don't cast the card using its miracle ability, it will remain in your hand.

* You can reveal and cast a card with miracle on any turn, not just your own, if it's the first card you've drawn that turn.

* You don't have to reveal a drawn card with miracle if you don't wish to cast it at that time.

* You can cast a card for its miracle cost only as the miracle triggered ability resolves. If you don't want to cast it at that time (or you can't cast it, perhaps because there are no legal targets available), you won't be able to cast it later for the miracle cost.

* You cast the card with miracle during the resolution of the triggered ability. Ignore any timing restrictions based on the card's type.

* It's important to reveal a card with miracle before it is mixed with the other cards in your hand.

* Multiple card draws are always treated as a sequence of individual card draws. For example, if you haven't drawn any cards yet during a turn and cast a spell that instructs you to draw three cards, you'll draw them one at a time. Only the first card drawn this way may be revealed and cast using its miracle ability.

* If the card with miracle leaves your hand before the triggered ability resolves, you won't be able to cast it using its miracle ability.

* You draw your opening hand before any turn begins. Cards you draw for your opening hand can't be cast using miracle.

702.92. Soulbond

702.92a. Soulbond is a keyword that represents two triggered abilities. "Soulbond" means "When this creature enters the battlefield, if you control both this creature and another creature and both are unpaired, you may pair this creature with another unpaired creature you control for as long as both remain creatures on the battlefield under your control" and "Whenever another creature enters the battlefield under your control, if you control both that creature and this one and both are unpaired, you may pair that creature with this creature for as long as both remain creatures on the battlefield under your control."

702.92b A creature becomes "paired" with another as the result of a soulbond ability. Abilities may refer to a paired creature, the creature another creature is paired with, or whether a creature is paired. An "unpaired" creature is one that is not paired.

702.92c When the soulbond ability resolves, if either object that would be paired is no longer a creature, no longer on the battlefield, or no longer under the control of the player who controls the soulbond ability, neither object becomes paired.

702.92d A creature can be paired with only one other creature.

702.92e A paired creature becomes unpaired if any of the following occur: another player gains control of it or the creature it's paired with; it or the creature it's paired with stops being a creature; or it or the creature it's paired with leaves the battlefield.

* Two paired creatures are still individual creatures in every way: they attack and block individually, they are targeted and affected by spells or abilities individually, and they change zones individually. If two paired creatures are attacking, blocking one of them has no effect on the other, for example.

* Neither soulbond ability targets any creature.

* You must control another unpaired creature at the moment a creature with soulbond enters the battlefield or the soulbond ability won't trigger at all. However, the creature that pairs with the creature with soulbond isn't chosen until the soulbond ability resolves.

* If the pair is broken, the bonuses and abilities granted to the creatures immediately disappear. If the bonus included an increase to toughness, this may cause a creature to have damaged marked on it equal to or greater than its toughness. If that happens, the creature is destroyed.

* If becoming unpaired causes a creature to no longer have an activated ability, instances of that ability that have already been activated and are on the stack are unaffected.

* Certain keywords granted to paired creatures are only relevant at a specific time, usually during combat, so becoming unpaired and no longer having that ability may have no effect on the current turn. For example, if a creature with reach blocks a flying creature and then loses reach, the creature with flying will still be blocked.

* A creature with soulbond may grant an ability to itself and the creature it's paired with that includes the text "this creature." In such abilities, "this creature" refers only to the creature that has that ability, not the creature it's paired with.

* If a creature with soulbond is paired with another creature with soulbond, each of them will receive both bonuses.

* If you control multiple unpaired creatures with soulbond and another creature enters the battlefield, each soulbond ability will trigger. Soulbond abilities that try to resolve after you pair the creature will have no effect.

* If a paired creature with soulbond loses soulbond, it and the creature it's paired with remain paired.


Justin emailed asking the following:

I've always been a fan of dragons and probably my favorite cards ever were the Elder Dragon Legends and the legendary Dragons from Invasion and the Commander decks. I absolutely love that Nicol Bolas has achieved Planeswalker status (and I thought with interesting mechanics); were there any plans (or like myself, hopes) that others, like Arcades Sabboth, may ignite a spark? Maybe even Sarkhan becoming a bit "scalier?" Thanks for great stories and a great game!

Justin

We hear from Doug Beyer on the Magic Creative Team:

Hi Justin,

Thanks for the questions! We are big fans of the scaly-bitey types as well. A legendary dragon has a way of capturing people's attention (and it helps when their characters are attached to a 6/6 or 7/7—or a three-color Planeswalker—so they hit the table like a ton of scaly bricks). In general, we don't spoil our future storyline plans—sorry, we just like keeping surprises for the right time. But in the past storyline, the four Elder Dragons other than Nicol Bolas perished long ago, so their chapter might be done. The dragon-worshipping Planeswalker Sarkhan Vol is down, but not out, after having been bested at the Eye of Ugin by Jace and Chandra. He's still presumed to be working in service of Bolas right now, and that has taken a toll on his sanity—but he certainly might show up again. Thanks, Justin!

Doug Beyer, Magic Creative Team

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